Mandalay – Instinct

Mandalay - Instinct (2000)

Mandalay – Instinct (2000)

Another one of those bands that ceased to exist long ago, and still a decade later I can find interesting stuff when going through their albums. Instinctis particularly interesting because of its downtempo nature, the subtle electronic influence and the always fragile and yet powerful vocals by Nicola Hitchcock. The combination of those elements and her voice should be totally trademarked, I mean, it’s a formula I’ve never seen anywhere else and maybe there wasn’t much of an audience for that and hence the reason Mandalay disbanded (although I doubt that was the true reason behind the break up).

This might not be the album you want to hear if you’re on a bright mood, this is the kind of album you put on when you’re looking for an intimate atmosphere or you want to create a mysterious ambient. Yes, this album works wonderful as bedroom music, if you know what I mean… But that’s not the reason why this album has so much going for it, that is just a nice side effect.

I always thought that Mandalay’s music shares a huge resemblance with music from other artists such as Delirium, and I’m sure I’m not alone on that, it is kind of futile to do those comparisons now that the band is extinct. But the truth is that this album should be noted for its consistency all the way through, as it never loses that aura of mystery and still at the same time remains a sensuous, intimate and inciting proposal.

I believe that one of the more intriguing highlights is that you never actually quite end getting all of it. There are always some parts that remain elusive and while you might think that you got used to it, you listen to it some time later and it’s like new question arises, new feelings and emotions start to emerge and you’re back to the starting point again. This isn’t because the experience tends to be random and you got it wrong the last time, it is just the way Instinct tends to be, and that’s what makes it an interesting experience by itself.

The experience, however, wouldn’t be complete without the element that I believe is what glues everything together: the vocals. Hitchcock’s performance might suggest fragility at first glance, but the truth is that there’s not a single moment of hesitation in everything she does, and as a result Instinct feels solid, confident and even surprising once you get the whole picture. Some might argue that the use of double tracking for the vocal performance might diminish the value of the performance, as is evident during some of the songs, but I personally believe that in this case is justified when you consider how extraordinary Nicola Hitchcock sounds while doing back vocals for Nicola Hitchcock… Is evident that the intention was never to create a false sensation of a stronger voice, the intention was to provide the main voice with an effective counterpart that enhances Hitchcock performance even further.

If you don’t like the calm and introspective nature of downtempo, chances are that you will end up skipping this album almost straight away. But if you do like it, this is one of those trip hop albums that age particularly well and that will never sound out of place no matter if it is 10, 15 or 20 years old.

I’m suspicious that you will give Instinct a try, lured by the atmosphere created by the many elements that are present here, but in the end you will stay for the elements that you can’t see but are also there.

 

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